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Irish Heritage

Ruins of Ballymacool

Those ruins stand, charred by fire Not set by a rebels hand Though many of it’s type out to the flame By …

What Loss to Gain a King!

The foundation story of the Clan Eoghanachta, with the tragic death of Eoghan, and the craftiness of Díl the Druid…

Folk of the Land of the Whin

From where to the world’s four corners spread All desire to, but few manage to return To children tales told, songs sung …

Give Stonehenge Back to the Irish!

One legend states the stones of Stonehenge came from Killare in Westmeath, the Hill of Uisneach. When Merlins army failed to take them by force, he took them by majic, wanting “The Giants Ring” to make a monument to an army of his that died in battle.

Another legend says a Westmeath woman sold them to the devil. Which is true? We explore in rhyme…

The Cock and the Crock of Gold

The legend of the Cock and the Crock of Gold in Kilcormac, in the times of the Wars of the Molloys… The …

To Carry a Hen When Walking

“Is trom Cearc i bhfad.” Translation: “A hen is heavy over a long distance.” Meaning: Something apparently easy may become difficult over …

A Holy Book Proves No Shield

The death of Mahon, the King, who set a little too much faith in the Bible for protection! An old verse of …

Flickering Candles Foretell Death

A tradition of foretelling a death from North Longford… From the Irish Folklore Commission In days gone by a tradition old Of …

Whats in a Name

By Mac and O the rhyme does go An Irishman can be known Through this rhyme and a little time The truth …

The Old Tongue of the Fishermen

Its spoke no more on boggy field By peasants who live under roofs of thatch Who smoke piped tobacco and drink buttermilk …

Salmon of Knowledge

Tobar Segais by hazel trees nine Shed each a nut to the waters still And a salmon hungry there was swimming And …

No Horse Sense in Galway

The furore being kicked up over urban horses by supporters of Mike Cubbard a city council member rumbles on. Something of a …

Cutting the Yarrow

A Halloween Game – as detailed here on the Irish Folklore Commission – in North Longford was called “Cutting the Yarrow“ Eleven …

The Fourth Funnel

Proud men of Belfast built her Rivets driven blow by blow Built with inner savage pride Workers today seldom know… And from …

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